(CDL) How To Get Your Class C RV Licenses

(CDL) How To Get Your Class C RV Licenses

That’s right. You can drive RV’s without a special license.

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In fact, most states require you to have a special class of driver’s license in order to operate an RV.

However, the catch is that your regular car or motorcycle license allows you to drive any vehicle with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) up to 26,000 lbs., which includes most Class C RVs.

So if you want to save some money on DMV fees and get your CDL & Hazmat endorsements done at the same time as your Class C road test, then this video will show you how that can be accomplished!

How To Get Your Class C RV Licenses CDL

1.State Rules

To start off, make sure that you know whether or not your state has its own rules for operating RVs. Some states allow you to drive RVs with a regular car or motorcycle license. Other states require you to get a special Class C driver’s license for operating any vehicle in that state, including an RV.

If your state allows it (like I have in my home state of Arizona), then the process is easier, because all you need is your regular automobile/motorcycle driver’s license and knowledge test from the DMV. If your state requires an extra CDL for driving RVs, then this tutorial can still help you prepare for your RV class test!

2. Proper Equipment and Inspections

Before getting started, make sure that your RV has:

The proper equipment needed on a certified passenger vehicle . This includes brake lights, turn signals, mirrors, emergency lights, and a horn.

A six-month or newer inspection sticker . If your state requires periodic safety inspections (like mine), then you’ll need to show proof of this.

3. DMV Office

First, go to the DMV office and obtain a form for taking an additional class of driver’s license. You can usually do this without an appointment; however, it is best to call ahead so that you don’t waste time standing in line only to find out they get busy after you arrive.

Some states even allow you to take the written exam online before going into the office. It saves on waiting time when at the DMV if you know what kind of test(s) you’re going in there for!

Once inside, walk up to the “class licenses” window and ask for a form. Give them your existing license, fill out the new-license information, and have it signed by yourself or another licensed driver with at least one year of experience driving a passenger vehicle (these must be people who are not related to you).

Make sure that you wait until they give you back the form before leaving. This is how they will know that you have paid for a new license in addition to your old one.

4. Study For Exam Online

Now that you have your updated driver’s license, go back home and study for the written exam , because this is going to help boost your chances of passing on the first try!

Next, go online to find an RV permit practice test . Be sure to study this. It has the same questions that you will see on the real test. Be prepared for these, because some of the information in them might not be what you would expect!

5. Permit Exam

When you think you’re ready, visit your local DMV office and take the permit exam .

This is a written test only; no driving involved! At this point, it’s easy to get discouraged if your score was low due to nerves or something like that.

I’m here to tell you that it doesn’t mean anything until the actual road test! So don’t panic just because of an 85% passing rate on a written DMV practice permit test—it’s not reflective of how well you’ll do when behind-the-wheel for real.

Now that you have your permit, it’s time to sweeten the deal by doing some DMV practice tests online ! These will give you a fairly accurate idea of what to expect on the real exam and save you from another potential round of disappointment.

6. Study For Road Exam

When I was preparing for my Class C road exam, I spent about 2-3 hours studying everything listed above every single day for two weeks straight.

It absolutely glued it into my head so that when the big day came, I knew exactly what to do and how to handle all possible scenarios.

You could probably get away with reading just one book or even taking 3 online practice exams if you already have a lot of car/motorcycle experience under your belt (and know how RV driving differs from regular, non-commercial driving). Remember that this is your safety we’re talking about!

Do you need a CDL to drive an RV in Texas?

You do not need a CDL to drive an RV in Texas.

I know, of all the things to worry about with your big rolling house on wheels as you drive across America (or even just through Texas), worrying about a CDL might seem less than important.

But believe me, the fact that you don’t need one will save you money and ensure that when you travel in your RV, you have maximum flexibility while still remaining safer on the road.

Do you need a special license to drive an RV in Georgia?

There are no specific driving requirements for any vehicle, including an RV, except those specifically noted in State and Federal laws if the Vehicle is under 26000 pounds.

However, an individual must have a valid driver’s license or learner’s permit issued by the Georgia Department of Driver Services before operating a motor vehicle on public roads.

States That Require A Commercial Driver’s License

  • Arkansas: CDL required for vehicle over 26,000 lb
  • Connecticut: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Hawaii: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Kansas: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • New Mexico: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Washington, D.C.: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Wisconsin: CDL required over 45 feet

States That Require A Non-Commercial Special Driver’s License

  • California: Class B license required over 26,000 lb or over 40 feet; Class A license required for towing over 10,000 lbs
  • Maryland: Class B license required over 26,000 lb
  • Michigan: Recreational Double “R” Endorsement required to tow a fifth wheel plus a trailer (it’s unlikely that you’ll ever need this)
  • North Carolina: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Nevada: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb; “J” Endorsement required to tow a vehicle over 10,000 lb (if the combined weight is less than 26,000 lb)
  • New York: Recreational Vehicle or “R” endorsement required for vehicles over 26,000 lb
  • Pennsylvania: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; equired for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • South Carolina: Class E license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class F license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Texas: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb
  • Wyoming: Class B license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing under 10,000 lb; Class A license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing over 10,000 lb

Conclusion

So how did you do? With everything above, you should be good to go. If you still need help with passing the test in your state, let me know in the comments below (and please share any other tips that helped you pass!).

Good luck! Here’s a hint : take one practice test and study it thoroughly before attempting the next step. I can almost guarantee that if you pass every single online or book mock exam with flying colors, then when it comes time for the real thing, you’ll cruise right through it without any problems!

RCT

We own and operate multiple camping and RV Trailer site. Its our passion to see the world thru camping and traveling. There is no bigger pleasure for us then to share with you our readers our experience in RV Travels and Camping.

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